Savings

Beef up savings

Recent savings stories

How long would your savings last if you had an emergency? For most Americans, not very long.
Saving early is saving smart. Compound interest can help you build a retirement nest egg.
Are Americans actually placing their hard-earned cash into emergency savings?
If you often tap your savings account, try one of these tricks to become stingy again.
Arkadi Kuhlmann, the chairman of ING Direct USA, explains why saving is important.
In all but one category, Americans feel better about their finances than they have since 2010.
Bankrate's survey reveals Americans' personal finance outlook in April.
Sort out the advantages and disadvantages of stashing your cash in CDs vs. a savings account.
Learn why it makes a difference to have interest on your savings credited more frequently.
No need to make massive life changes to save money. Baby step your way to saving.
Our poll shows which Americans feel confident about their finances. Do you?
Bankrate's charts reveal Americans' personal finance outlook in March.
This election year, our poll shows Democrats feel better about the economy than Republicans.
There are many options for your tax refund. Should you spend it, invest it or squirrel it away?
Guidelines govern who inherits your grandparents' bonds, but it might be costly to redeem them.
You don't have to make massive life changes to save money. In 2012, learn to save on texting.
You don't have to make massive changes to save money. Learn to save with unused gift cards.
You don't have to make massive life changes to save money. In 2012, learn to save on groceries.
You don't have to make massive life changes to save money. Learn to save on gym memberships.
You don't to make massive life changes to save money. Learn to save on gym memberships.
You don't have to make massive life changes to save money. In 2012, save with Internet streaming.
You don't have to make massive life changes to save money. In 2012, save with promotional rates.
As the emergency fund dwindles, there are options for staying afloat while being unemployed.
With excess income, consider surprise emergencies before prepaying your home loan.
Savings bonds aren't earning much compared to rising college costs. Try this option, instead.
Building savings for the future has gotten more costly. Put more money away with these tips.
Some 41 percent of Americans report feeling less comfortable about their savings.
About 1 in 4 Americans (24 percent) say their net worth is higher this year versus a year ago.
Seven out of 10 Americans say their financial situation is better or about the same as last year.
Interest rates on savings are likely to remain low. These are your choices for a better return.
If your rainy day is three years away, consider a short-term bond fund.
More Americans express optimism about their personal finances in Bankrate's most recent poll.
Bankrate's poll reveals nearly half of Americans review their finances six or more times a year.
The Financial Security Index rose to its highest level since June.
Low levels of job security dragged down Bankrate's index in November's survey.
If you can't find bonds from years ago, have them reissued. It's worth the earnings.
Unhappy with low interest rates on your checking account? Here are some options for your money.
These pastime holiday savings accounts are seeing growth. But are they the best way to save?
Having strong economic leaders tomorrow will take investment in financial education today.
Seventeen percent of Americans feel more job security now, up from 13 percent last month.
Some 14 percent of Americans report feeling more comfortable about their savings than last year.
Seven out of 10 Americans say their financial situation is better or about the same as last year.
Bankrate's Financial Security Index fell from last month, indicating Americans are still nervous.
To boost return, go with CDs. But first consider the risk of locking in your money before investing.
For the second month in a row, only 11 percent of Americans are more comfortable with their savings.
Just 20 percent of Americans feel their overall financial situation is better now than a year ago.
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